Graham-ophones

Links

ARTY GB (1) copy Zwarteschijf

Various Parts

Ken Priestley

Leather cloth

F R Ratchford J Hewitt

Diaphragms

Meadows and Passmore

PLEASE NOTE:

I DO NOT SUPPLY

ANY PARTS

I'M MERELY

A COLLECTOR.

Case Restoration - Portables

Basically there are 3 stages. Initial Cleaning, Repair, Finishing

1.  Initial Cleaning

Getting rid of decades of accumulated grime is the first challenge.  Soap and water come to mind BUT water is the enemy so as little wetness as possible is called for.  I use Sugar Soap in a spray which I work into the "grain" of the Rexine gently with a nail brush.   (Please note for the photos I have just worked on a small part of the case and for purposes of illustration have not removed the hardware.  When doing the whole case the handle, lid catch and needle case would be removed.)

( I have also heard that Swarfega hand cleanser is also very useful for cleaning.  The main concerns when choosing a suitable cleaner is using as little water as possible and avoiding cleaners containing solvents).

2. Repair

Before proceeding it may be necessary to carry out repairs.  Common faults include tears, shrinkage and blistering.  For scuffs and shrinkage the use of a felt tip pen can be useful, touching up where elements of the underlying case are showing through.  In the case of major shrinkage or deep scuffs that allow the case to show through the Rexine it will be necessary use a patch which can be taken from the Rexine overlap that is visible inside the case under the level of the motor board.  In both cases coat the underside of the patch with either animal glue or PVA. Place over the area concerned.  Carefully cut through both the patch and the layer below. Peel away the excess from both layers.  Alternatively holes in the covering can be "filled" with artists heavy body acrylic paint mixed to the correct shade and applied to the hole in a manner that will build up to the thickness of the Rexine.  The acrylic can be textured and blended to suit. Blistering requires either carefully slitting the centre of the blister with a scalpel and manipulting the adhesive into the blistered area with a thin piece of card or injecting diluted PVA into the blister.  A neater approach can be achieved witha hyperdermic syringe but understandably these may be difficult to obtain!    (Where the case is suffering from major damage recovering may be the only answer.  For suppliers of suitable Rexine material see links opposite. Note though that different grains are available.  Morooco pattern grain is the one to buy if it is available.)

3. Finishing

Finally all that may remain to be done is a polish with a good quality leather polish.  I have used Autglym Leather Polish available from car accessory shops.  However it may be that assessment of the finish determines that some colour restoration is required.  To do this a wide range of colours and shades of shoe renovation creams are available from shoe repairers.  It is important to obtain the closest shade as possible to the gramophone.  In the case of differences I have found that the creams can be mixed (see photo)  An important point to remember is that the creams do contain a dye and therefore need to be applied evenly or ugly patches may occur.  Another point worthy of mention is that it is beneficial to leave the creams on the case for two days prior to polishing to allow the dyes to penetrate scuffs and scrapes

PLEASE NOTE YOU TRY ANY OF THE ABOVE PROCESSES AND MATERIALS AT YOUR OWN RISK.  

WHATEVER YOU DO DO NOT ATTEMPT TO CLEAN AREAS OF THE COVERING WITH CELLULOSE THINNERS, ACETONE OR SIMILAR SOLVENTS. THEY WILL LITERALLY MELT THE REXINE. GOOD LUCK.